Showing posts tagged iPad

LinkedIn app for iPad still traps web links inside their app. Protectionist thinking means sharing isn’t possible.

LinkedIn app for iPad still traps web links inside their app. Protectionist thinking means sharing isn’t possible.

Dear fellow Bart rider, this is me turning in your lost iPad. You’re welcome. I want the same treatment from anybody else.

Why not just use Bart’s lost and found? Because last time I found a phone and turned it in the station agent just seemed completely annoyed.

Dear fellow Bart rider, this is me turning in your lost iPad. You’re welcome. I want the same treatment from anybody else.



Why not just use Bart’s lost and found? Because last time I found a phone and turned it in the station agent just seemed completely annoyed.
Paper has my full attention and has made a splash at Punchcut because of it’s brilliant “Rewind” to undo gesture.After using Paper a bit — and becoming enamored by the simplicity and beauty of its pen  set — I’ve retooled all my SketchBook Pro pens to match the finesse of Paper’s. But SketchBook will never be Paper. Sigh. Here’s why:I keep going back to Paper because of the organization! I have a messy junk drawer of SketchBook Pro drawings and only half of them are mine (half are my kids’). The brilliance of Paper could just be in the organizational model, and the brilliance of swiping between pages, pinching in and out of “books”. (A book for my each of my kids’ drawings would be brilliant.)

Conclusion: Paper is a bicycle: it’s delightful, versatile, lightweight. Yet limited in important ways.SketchBook Pro is a battleship: with an insurmountable list of features and customizations of pens, yet still unwieldy. And it crashes a lot.

Paper has my full attention and has made a splash at Punchcut because of it’s brilliant “Rewind” to undo gesture.



After using Paper a bit — and becoming enamored by the simplicity and beauty of its pen set — I’ve retooled all my SketchBook Pro pens to match the finesse of Paper’s. But SketchBook will never be Paper. Sigh.



Here’s why:



I keep going back to Paper because of the organization! I have a messy junk drawer of SketchBook Pro drawings and only half of them are mine (half are my kids’). The brilliance of Paper could just be in the organizational model, and the brilliance of swiping between pages, pinching in and out of “books”. (A book for my each of my kids’ drawings would be brilliant.)

Conclusion:
Paper is a bicycle: it’s delightful, versatile, lightweight. Yet limited in important ways.

SketchBook Pro is a battleship: with an insurmountable list of features and customizations of pens, yet still unwieldy. And it crashes a lot.

Can’t decide which annoys more: iPad that won’t tether automatically or Galaxy Tab that auto-joined when it was asleep, inside my bag.



The daily pairing of iPad and iPhone require accessing settings on both devices. The Galaxy Tab would tether even when the screen was locked. If I left the house and came back hours later my iPhone would indicate the Galaxy Tab had connected. Now I’m left wondering if the Galaxy’s poor battery life was because it was looking for and connecting to WiFi all the time.

At a time when tethering data is at a premium and battery life is paramount, both the iPad and Galaxy (Android Honeycomb) need a better UI solution. Apple’s method at least errs on the side of deliberate, not accidental, pairing.

What will I miss about the Galaxy Tab?


I borrowed the Galaxy Tab 10.1 from the Punchcut device library back in November so I could immerse myself in Android land. When I replaced it with the new iPad my daughter asked what I would miss about the Galaxy tab. My wife just laughed.

Android widgets. I’ll miss Android widgets, honestly. Apple’s still not ever done anything serious about their lacking iOS home experience.

Native Gmail on the Galaxy Tab stands out. It’s solid. It looks great and it’s fast. Gmail on the iPad’s Mail app is weak – it misses tags and filters that make Gmail great. Gmail in iPad’s Safari could be so much better.

Featherlight. I don’t know how the Galaxy Tab manages to be so lightweight. I never tired of it as a reader (but I missed my iBooks library!). The iPad 1 felt like a brick by comparison. With the new iPad 3 I’m trading up to better battery life and getting a slightly heavier device (still lighter than iPad 1, thankfully).

Sadly, the one app, that hardly qualifies as “must-have,” is the NXT Remote that controls the Lego Mindstorms NXT robot. I’ll have to check out one of the Android handsets lying around for that.

Amazon Skews Tablet Search Results



My sense is Amazon will not be lambasted the way Google would be if they skewed their search results the way Amazon does. Can you blame Amazon? No. (Not really.) But you can call shenanigans when you see the product category tags for the competing devices.

In a search for “nook” the B&N device comes up second, after a comparison “feature” article (not even a product result.) Now look at the product category, “office products”. (Lambaste, lambaste.)

A search for “ipad” again yields the second-place treatment.

#ProTip: Stream music to a mobile device instead of your laptop while working.

The chief benefit is that it distributes the processing load from your main workstation to an external device.

The go-to music sources all have mobile apps (Pandora, Spotify, iTunes, Rdio, &c.) My favorite underdog music service of the moment is still Dragontape. Create and listen to (watch) user-generated YouTube music video playlists. Compose “tapes” on an iPad, iPhone or in a PC browser.

Currently listening to this gem: Bon Iver / Bon Iver.